Feathers on Friday: Who is my mystery bird?

For Charlotte’s ‘Feathers on Friday’ challenge, I have a bird who came and perched on the rockery in our backyard. I usually only photograph the big water birds, but this cute little fellow posed so nicely for me and was very deserving of a photo. Now for the life of me, I can’t find out what he is. I’ve painstakingly searched on Google to no avail, and my bird guide is packed away in a box somewhere in the storage unit. Can any of you identify him?

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I’m also linking this to Jude’s ‘March Wildlife in the Garden’ challenge.

Happy Friday to you all. Hope your Easter weekend is a really lovely one, whatever your plans are.

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106 comments on “Feathers on Friday: Who is my mystery bird?

  1. Lovely photo! I too immediately thought of a mockingbird, but that yellow was so wrong, so I wondered if it was some tropical species I’m not familiar with. But I like the pollen in the face solution! Not streaky enough for the Bahamas mockingbird. The wagtail? Now that’s really geographically unlikely, plus it doesn’t really look like the photos I’m seeing of them. I bet there’s loads of yummy yellow pollen around these days.
    You should listen online to Mockingbird songs – there’s quite a lot of variation, but a common theme, and they’re fabulous. I hope you can listen to one soon!

  2. Easter gives hope for tomorrow,
    As after the winter comes Spring.
    Our hearts can be filled with gladness
    As hearts rejoice and sing.
    Happy Easter

  3. Awwww, this mockingbird is such a cutie Sylvia! Love those colours and you took such an excellent shot of it! πŸ˜€ β™₯

  4. Well, Sylvia, I’m leaning more towards a Northern Mockingbird that has pollen on his face/neck. Two reasons: 1) the beak is thicker & has a slight curve on the top like a mockingbird; a wagtail beak is more straight and pointed; 2) the color of the eye looks to be a mockingbird, wagtails are solid dark/black. Sorry if I got you back to being confused again! And I am not an expert, so I could be wrong of course. Here’s another mockingbird with pollen on it’s face, although not as much…. http://www.terrichapmanphotography.com/Birds/Birds-of-Winter-20142015/i-rmBzhZd/ If it’s pollen, your bird sure was having a helluva time with it! πŸ˜‰

  5. My resident birder is thinking it’s a Bahama mockingbird. The yellow around the beak (that threw off one commenter) could possibly be pollen. Then again there’s the all-encompassing LBB (little black -or brown bird!) πŸ˜‰

    Happy Easter to you, too! I’m FINALLY getting over the nastiest cold in my lifetime. We’re headed south to see what Eric accomplished while I was lazing around being sick.

    • So happy to know you’re on the mend. It must have been a very evil strain that got up your nose. 😯 Thank your ‘resident birder’ so much for confusing me even more than I already was. I think I’ll settle for a Citrine warbling, mocking, wagtail feathered friend. πŸ˜€ Enjoy the ‘Big Reveal’. I’m sure you’re going to be impressed with Eric’s handiwork. πŸ™‚ xx

  6. I don’t know birds, but you will find out, I’m sure, and the next time we see him he will also have a cute nickname and a personality. He is a cutie. I thought of you when I tried to take a picture of a woodpecker who I thought was posing for me. Just as I had him focused ready to press the button, poof, off he went. πŸ™‚

  7. I think nowathome is right – a wagtail it is. We do not have the citrine one here, but a yellow wagtail. This one is not that yellow, so I believe she is right. Beautiful, beautiful capture, Sylvia! I wish you a lovely Easter weekend.

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