One Word Sunday: Lost

Debbie’s ‘One Word Sunday-Lost’, got me searching through my Florida wildlife photos, and I quickly came up with four, showing a poor creature that has lost its life. Of course all creatures have to eat to live, but it’s always rather sad to see the ones that have ended up as part of the food chain.

Mr GBH however, looks delighted and obviously doesn’t think it’s sad at all.

He seems to do quite well with his fishing expeditions and certainly hasn’t lost his touch over the years that I’ve been observing him.

You could say that any fish within striking distance of that beak has already lost the battle.

The Cormorant is also very adept at skewering his sushi for lunch. Another hapless fish lost for all time, about to go down the hatch.

I hope you’re all having a lovely, relaxing Sunday. If you have any photos which show something lost or as in my case, of a creature that lost the battle with a predator, just click the link.

One Word Sunday: Large, Larger, Largest.

One of the largest and most spectacular of Florida’s birds, is the Great Blue Heron, and those of you who have followed my blog for a while will know that Mr. GBH is my favourite. Great Blue Herons grow to between 3.2 to 4.5 feet and have a wingspan of 5.5 to 6.5 feet.

They are carnivores and have quite an appetite for sushi, devouring about a pound of fish a day. They are also not averse to feeding on a wide range of shrimp, crabs, aquatic insects, rodents and other small mammals when the opportunity arises. I was horrified to read that they also occasionally snaffle up a duckling or two when Momma duck isn’t looking.

Mr. GBH is such an elegant guy and can strike quite the pose especially when he knows he’s being photographed. He’s so proud of his subtle blue-gray plumage, his slim, cellulite-free legs and that dagger of a beak which can strike like lightning when his laser-like stare spots his next meal.

Great blue herons mostly nest in colonies called ‘heronries’ in trees near water. They are usually monogamous during any one season, but next season often decide to try out a new mate, and scuffles over females are quite common, although never to the death.

To Native Americans, the Heron is a symbol of patience, self-reliance and self-determination. Even though his legs are long and spindly, he has the ability to stand firm and motionless as he calmly waits for his prey to appear.

Debbie’s ‘One Word Sunday- Large, Larger, Largest’ is responsible for Mr. GBH’s appearance here today. To join in her challenge, just click the link.

I hope your week is going well. It’s getting warm again here in Florida and feels more like summer than winter. Hubby and I are looking forward to meeting friends for lunch tomorrow at a waterfront restaurant with outdoor seating.