Daily Prompt: Clouds I Have Seen

Today’s Daily Prompt ‘Clouds’ reminded me of this Joni Mitchell song from the 1960’s, one of my all-time favourites.

Bows and flows of  angel hair
And ice cream castles in the air
And feather canyons everywhere
I’ve looked at clouds that way

But now they only block the sun
They rain and snow on everyone
So many things I would have done
But clouds got in my way

I’ve looked at clouds from both sides now
From up and down, and still somehow
It’s cloud illusions I recall
I really don’t know clouds at all.

Here are some clouds I’ve been privileged to see on my travels around this beautiful world. I thought it might be fun to show some photos where the clouds, although quite prominent, weren’t the real focus for the shot; like this one taken through the window of our tour bus in Ecuador.

DSCF0960

Here’s the relaxing view from our hotel in Myrtle Beach SC.

DSCF0057

Mount Vesuvius looks down on the ruins of Pompeii.

SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

Instantly recognisable beneath the clouds, are the ancient ruins of Machu Picchu.

DSCF0620

The Sri Mariamman temple, rising up to the clouds, is the oldest Hindu temple in Singapore.

DSCF1488

This monster Toucan and his friend Mr. Parrot sit under a cloudy sky in a Costa Rica  waterside park.

DSCN5734

Here under the lowering clouds in Lakota lies the eerie scene of the Battle of the Little Bighorn,  commonly known as ”Custer’s Last Stand’.

SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

This shot of Mount Rushmore taken from the side, shows just the profile of George Washington, one of the four past presidents who are featured in this massive sculpture.

SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

Clouds hovered over La Paz in Bolivia, as we drove down from El Alto  airport at an altitude of almost 12,000 feet.

DSCF0349

Looking down over  Cape Town from Table Mountain,  3,558 feet above Table Bay.

DSCF0038

Clouds over a beach of soft white sand in Punta Cana. Absolute paradise on earth.

SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

I don’t know about you, but just looking at all these photos has given me itchy feet. Time to travel again.  I think  I’ll just go and tell  hubby to hurry up with the house renovations.

Hope you’re all having a great Thursday.

 

 

 

 

Save

Clouds

Save

Save

Advertisements

Thursday’s Special: Traces Of An Inca Empire

 

For Paula’s Thursday’s Special, ‘Traces Of The Past’, I’ve chosen this photo of one of the most important places on my Bucket List. The ancient city of Machu Picchu in Peru, is believed by most archaeologists to have been built as an estate for the Inca emperor, Pachacuti (1438-72). It had lain hidden amidst dense jungle-covered mountains until 1911, when American historian, Hiram Bingham, announced his discovery of it. Can you just imagine the excitement he must have felt on suddenly discovering this magical silent landscape for the first time?

The well-preserved ruins overlooking the Vilcanata river valley, and surrounded by colossal green mountains, seem to almost cling to the steep hillside. Even if you’ve seen photos of this wondrous structure, it doesn’t in the slightest prepare you for seeing the breath-taking and awe-inspiring sight, firsthand.
DSCF0615

You realise when you get there, that you don’t just ‘visit’ Machu Picchu, you feel as though you are making a pilgrimage there. The Chilean poet, Pablo Neruda wrote, “Machu Picchu is a trip to the serenity of the soul, to the eternal fusion with the cosmos; where we feel our fragility. It is one of the greatest marvels of South America. A resting place of butterflies in the epicentre of the great circle of life. One more miracle.”

jupiter-widget_text-e1395873810536

Above Machu Picchu for Ailsa’s Travel Theme.

Ailsa’s Travel Theme this week, brought to mind the wonderful view from the top of Machu Picchu, the ‘Lost City of the Incas’, which I was privileged to visit in 2003.

(Click on photos for a larger, sharper view.)

DSCF0606
This ancient Inca city, is believed by most archaeologists to have been built as an estate for the Inca emperor Pachacuti (1438-72). It had lain hidden amidst dense jungle-covered mountains until in 1911, when American historian Hiram Bingham, announced his discovery.

DSCF0598

The well-preserved ruins overlooking the Vilcanata river valley, seem to almost cling to the steep hillside, and are surrounded by colossal green mountains. Even if you’ve seen photos of this wondrous structure, it doesn’t really prepare you for the breathtaking and awe-inspiring sight when you see it firsthand.

DSCF0611

Of course, to see the amazing views from above, you have to actually get up there, and we were transported at speed along this narrow winding road with many hazardous hairpin bends. Meeting another vehicle head on seemed a very likely possibility, but the drivers were fortunately very experienced, and although my heart was in my mouth most of the way up and down, we made it safely.

DSCF0600

To see more entries for Ailsa’s Theme, just click here.

 

 

WPC ‘Room’: Inca rooms at Machu Picchu

This weeks photo challenge ‘Room’, had me remembering my visit to the ancient Inca site of Machu Picchu. You can see from my picture gallery, that there there were a great many rooms in this royal retreat. Of course, all the roofs have long since gone, but the dry stone walls have survived the centuries. It’s believed by most archaeologists to have been built as an estate for the Inca Emperor Pachacuti Inca Yupanqui (1438-71), and lay hidden amidst dense jungle-covered mountains until it was discovered by American historian, Hiram Bingham in 1911.

Click on any pic to enlarge and view gallery.

“Machu Picchu is a trip to the serenity of the soul, to the eternal fusion with the cosmos; where we feel our fragility. It is one of the greatest marvels of South America. A resting place of butterflies in the epicentre of the great circle of life. One more miracle.” ~ Pablo Neruda

 

To see more rooms for the challenge, just click on the icon below.

Wordless-Wednesday-Button-1501

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WPC: On the move around the world.

Here’s my interpretation of this weeks Photo Challenge, ‘On the Move’.

My header pic was taken in May 2001, when we visited our son in New York, and spent some time watching the rollerblading at ‘The Band Shell’ in Central Park. This sort of moving is something I’ve never mastered, but I love to watch others, even when they take a tumble.

Whilst in Cairns Australia, we took the scenic railway up to Kuranda. The train passes through World Heritage protected tropical rainforest, past spectacular waterfalls and into the awesome Barron Gorge. It’s a very long train, and a very winding track, so if you lean out of the window, it’s possible to photograph the front of the train,

DSCF1389

and also the rear end.

DSCF1395

Our return journey, was via the Skyrail, which carried us in our gondola, over and through the rainforest canopy and we were treated to the most breathtaking views.

DSCF1450

These people, including hubby, are sitting on top of the train which took us between Riobamba and Alausi in Ecuador. This famous ride which wound through the rough terrain of the Andes, is known as “Nariz del Diablo” (The Devil’s Nose).  We saw spectacular views of the Ecuadorian landscape, including the Chimborazo volcano. I opted to sit inside on a comfortable seat, but once we got going, I regretted my choice, as I’m sure I missed out on some of the best views.

DSCF0930

This little train ride in the Italian medieval town of Pisa, was not at all challenging. It took us from our coach to the cathedral complex, the site of the famous ‘Leaning Tower’.

SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

On the beautiful Isle of Capri, we took this cable car from the harbour, literally straight up the mountain to the town of Ana Capri, which is located high on the hills to the west. It was a breathtaking ride, but not nearly as scary as the taxi ride back down the mountain.

SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

Here, we were on the move in a high speed hydrofoil across Lake Titicaca, from Bolivia to Peru.

DSCF0471

A much more leisurely way to move across the lake, would be on this little yacht.

DSCF0441

Here is the train which took us from the Inca town of Ollantaytambo, to Aguas Calientes, which lies in the valley below the mysterious Inca ruins of amazing Machu Picchu . As you can see, the train runs right through the middle of the town.

DSCF0626

I hope you’ve enjoyed being on the move with me. It was only a whistle-stop tour today, but it was great for me to relive the wonderful memories from my travels.

To see more ‘On the move’, entries for the challenge, just click on the badge below.

wordpress-20141